PURELL Hand Sanitizer does not contain BPA

6/15/15

We are aware of a study by researchers from the University of Missouri and the University of Toulouse (France) who reported how much Bisphenol A (BPA) could be transferred from thermal paper receipts to the hands of volunteers who used PURELL® Hand Sanitizer in an unrealistic manner. 

Understanding the facts:

  • BPA is not an ingredient in PURELL Hand Sanitizer.  The BPA in the study came from thermal paper, not PURELL Hand Sanitizer.
  • This study is not about the safety of PURELL Hand Sanitizer.  This study is a report of the amount of BPA that was extracted from thermal paper after improper and unrealistic use of hand sanitizer by volunteers.
  • The experiments did not mimic real-world use of PURELL Hand Sanitizer.  Experiments were designed to dramatize a result.  Volunteers were asked to apply an overly large amount of hand sanitizer into their hands (three pumps), spread the sanitizer on their hands, and, while hands were still wet with the product, hold a large piece of thermal paper in their hands for up to 4 minutes.  A typical use of hand sanitizer involves a single pump of product, which evaporates completely when hands are rubbed together for 15 – 30 seconds or until hands are dry. 

Alcohol is the active ingredient in most instant hand sanitizers.  Alcohol is a proven active ingredient that kills germs and evaporates, maintains or even improves skin condition, and delivers an experience that is both likable and convenient. 

It is unfortunate that an improperly designed study that does not take into account the real world use of hand sanitizer could unnecessarily increase the level of public concern over a product with a proven record of safety and effectiveness, particularly at a time when hand hygiene is so important in protecting public health.